How Does BioProtect Protection Work?

The active ingredient in BioProtect polymerizes to all surfaces and is both colorless and odorless.

Think of BioProtect as a layer of electrically charged swords.  When a microorganism comes in contact with the treated surface, the quaternary amine sword punctures the cell membrane and the remnants are then electrocuted.

Since nothing is transferred to the now dead cell, the antimicrobial does not lose it’s strength and the sword is now ready for the next cell to contact it.  (NOTE: Normal cleaning of the treated surfaces is necessary in order for the BioProtect   antimicrobials to continue their effectiveness.  Dirt buildup,  paint, dead microbes, etc. will cover the treatment prohibiting it from killing microorganisms.)

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SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF DATA EXISTS TO DISMISS AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION OF INFECTION ANY LONGER

SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF DATA EXISTS TO DISMISS AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION OF INFECTION ANY LONGER

We recently attended a CDC workshop in Washington DC on nosocomial infections. The head of a modern hospital system categorically stated that there is no evidence to support airborne transmission. We agreed with him that perhaps no study has been done that meets the academic rigor needed to prove it as absolute law, but there certainly is some compelling data and evidence to suggest his stance is wrong. We challenged him to return to his hospital and turn off the electricity because that remains simply a theory. Clearly, that wouldn’t work so well. Theories examine what happens and then tell us how and why something happens. And they are, and should be, constantly tested.

Anecdotal evidence and compelling number of studies tell us infections indeed can be transferred via the air. There certainly is more than enough to suggest that it’s not only possible but likely, and further study and examination is warranted. An article recently published in the Public Library of Science – Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Virus – by members of the veterinarian community, which has led many of the studies relating to airborne infection, provides some evidence. Among their findings:
• Particles of small size can remain suspended in the air for long periods, potentially exposing a large number of susceptible individuals, including those close to the source and those at greater distances.
• The study indicated that virus-associated particles disperse simultaneously across a wide range of particle sizes. This is important because it shows that viruses in airborne particles emitted or generated by animals can be transmitted simultaneously across both short and long distances.
• Determining the particle size distribution for both respiratory and enteric viruses has important implications for the control of animal and human diseases and the use of droplet and airborne infection control measures.
• The information generated in this study is especially important to design effective airborne disease control programs for both enteric and respiratory viruses, including mitigation of occupational exposure of zoonotic pathogens. Changes in recommendations to protect from airborne viruses should be considered based on exposure to particles of different sizes.

Certainly some of what these researchers found at the least should motivate us to look more closely at how and why theories on airborne infection should be scrutinized more closely. We can’t categorically dismiss the possibilities as this hospital leader did. It’s time we take these issues much more seriously.

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LINENS AND UNIFORMS NEED A DETAILED CLEANING PROTOCOL TO COMBAT SECONDARY INFECTIONS

LINENS AND UNIFORMS NEED A DETAILED CLEANING PROTOCOL TO COMBAT SECONDARY INFECTIONS

During our last consulting session at a hospital, we asked what measures were being taken in the laundry process to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infections. The VP for facilities said the CDC didn’t see laundry items as vehicles that contribute to the spread of infection. They were concerned about the contamination of hard surfaces, and had procedures in place to deal with those surfaces. But soft and porous surfaces – linens, uniforms, bedding, curtains – were not being addressed in any detailed fashion. He said his hospital was following CDC guidelines. Laundry simply wasn’t on the list of potential concerns as it relates to the spread of infection. More than just a little evidence exists, however, that suggests that thought process might be flawed. Consider:

  • NOLA.com ran a piece that says five children died at Children’s Hospital in 2008 and 2009 after coming in contact with a deadly fungus transmitted to them through the linens they slept on, according to court records, interviews and a new report published by a pediatric medical journal. They included two newborns, a 13-year-old boy, a 10-year-old girl and an 11-year-old girl, according to the findings of a study led by a medical officer with the Centers for Disease Control and recently published by the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

Why wouldn’t hospitals have all staff in antimicrobial uniforms? Plenty of companies make them.

Strict protocol with the handling of laundry can help immensely. Take a look at some of the procedures advocated by Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council (HLAC), a non-profit organization formed for the purpose of inspecting and accrediting laundries processing healthcare textiles for hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities (http://www.hlacnet.org/standards.php).  The detailed procedures HLAC outlines are complete and impressive. And doable.

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ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IS A GLOBAL THREAT

ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IS A GLOBAL THREAT

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) within a wide range of infectious agents is a growing public health threat of broad concern to countries WHO artand multiple sectors. Increasingly, governments around the world are beginning to pay attention to a problem so serious that it threatens the achievements of modern medicine. A post-antibiotic era—in which common infections and minor injuries can kill—far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, is instead a very real possibility for the 21st century, according to the World Health Organization.

Threat List

• Escherichia coli
• Klebsiella pneumoniae
• Staphylococcus aureus
• Streptococcus pneumoniae
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shigella
• Neisseria gonorrhoeae
• Acinetobacter
• MDRO TB
• Candida
• NDM-1
• Clostridium difficile

Read the entire WHO report here: http://nanosafe1.com/WHO%20post%20antibiotic%20era.pdf

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SCHOOLS NEED TO TAKE COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO INFECTION CONTROL

SCHOOLS NEED TO TAKE COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO INFECTION CONTROL

Cleaning crews in schools are just like their counterparts in hospitals on the front lines of the war on disease.  Cleaning Schools for Health, Not for Appearance discusses this in some detail. How schools are cleaned can and will impact the health of all building occupants, including students and faculty. Hygiene is involves much more than seemingly clean surfaces.

Creating Healthy Indoor Air Quality in Schools is a comprehensive piece put out by the Environmental Protection Agency, focusing largely on surface hygiene. The EPA has created apps and a series of webinars outlining the threat of poor air quality. The air-surface interfaces in schools also impact air quality.

An evaluation of the impact of flooring types on exposures to fine and coarse particles within the residential micro-environment using CONTAM notes that walking across the floor will aerosolize particles on the floor and put them back into the air. If those particles are viruses or bacteria, it creates the threat of infection. If it is dirt, pollen or chemicals, the risk moves toward asthma triggers.

Hand hygiene is and always will remain critical to controlling infection. Proper hand hygiene will impact the health of staff and students.   Effects of Hand Hygiene Campaigns on Incidence of Laboratory-confirmed Influenza and Absenteeism in Schoolchildren, Cairo, Egypt  studies the effectiveness of intense hand hygiene.

Reducing Absenteeism From Gastrointestinal and Respiratory Illness in Elementary School Students: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of an Infection-Control Intervention concludes that “A multifactorial intervention including hand sanitizer and surface disinfection reduced absenteeism caused by gastrointestinal illness in elementary school students. Norovirus was found less often on classroom surfaces in the intervention group. Schools should consider adopting these practices to reduce days lost to common illnesses.”

Clean air, hands and surfaces will impact the health of your employees, volunteers and students.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Infection control is for everybody, even schools.

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