How Does BioProtect Protection Work?

The active ingredient in BioProtect polymerizes to all surfaces and is both colorless and odorless.

Think of BioProtect as a layer of electrically charged swords.  When a microorganism comes in contact with the treated surface, the quaternary amine sword punctures the cell membrane and the remnants are then electrocuted.

Since nothing is transferred to the now dead cell, the antimicrobial does not lose it’s strength and the sword is now ready for the next cell to contact it.  (NOTE: Normal cleaning of the treated surfaces is necessary in order for the BioProtect   antimicrobials to continue their effectiveness.  Dirt buildup,  paint, dead microbes, etc. will cover the treatment prohibiting it from killing microorganisms.)

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WHO REPORT: UNHEALTHY LIVING, WORKING ENVIRONMENTS CAN BE DEADLY

WHO REPORT: UNHEALTHY LIVING, WORKING ENVIRONMENTS CAN BE DEADLY

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) contribute to the largest share of environment-related deaths, according to new estimates released in March by the World Health Organization. Nearly one in four global deaths was a result of living or working in an unhealthy environment in 2012. That's an estimated 12.6 million people. The risk factors include air, water and soil pollution, chemical exposures, climate change and ultraviolet radiation. The majority of these are related to air pollution, which includes exposure to second-hand smoke. Strokes, heart disease, cancers and chronic respiratory disease amount to nearly two-thirds (8.2 million) of deaths caused by unhealthy environments. As increased access to safe water and sanitation improves, deaths from infectious disease have declined. Better accesses to immunization, insecticide-treated mosquito nets and essential medicines also have helped.

Among other noteworthy items in the report:

  • Regionally, the report finds, low- and middle-income countries in the WHO Southeast Asia and Western Pacific Regions had the largest environment-related disease burden in 2012, with a total of 7.3 million deaths, most attributable to indoor and outdoor air pollution.
  • Low- and middle-income countries bear the greatest environmental burden in all types of diseases and injuries, however for certain NCDs, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancers, the per capita disease burden can also be relatively high in high-income countries.
  • Looking across more than 100 disease and injury categories, the report finds that the vast majority of environment-related deaths are due to cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and ischemic heart disease.
  • The report cites proven strategies for improving the environment and preventing diseases. For instance, using clean technologies and fuels for domestic cooking, heating and lighting would reduce acute respiratory infections, chronic respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and burns. Increasing access to safe water and adequate sanitation and promoting hand washing would further reduce diarrheal diseases.
  • Tobacco smoke-free legislation reduces exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, and thereby also reduces cardiovascular diseases and respiratory infections. Improving urban transit and urban planning, and building energy-efficient housing would reduce air pollution-related diseases and promote safe physical activity.
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Thursday, 19 April 2018
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