How Does BioProtect Protection Work?

The active ingredient in BioProtect polymerizes to all surfaces and is both colorless and odorless.

Think of BioProtect as a layer of electrically charged swords.  When a microorganism comes in contact with the treated surface, the quaternary amine sword punctures the cell membrane and the remnants are then electrocuted.

Since nothing is transferred to the now dead cell, the antimicrobial does not lose it’s strength and the sword is now ready for the next cell to contact it.  (NOTE: Normal cleaning of the treated surfaces is necessary in order for the BioProtect   antimicrobials to continue their effectiveness.  Dirt buildup,  paint, dead microbes, etc. will cover the treatment prohibiting it from killing microorganisms.)

Read More...

WATERBORNE PATHOGENS ARE A THREAT FROM MANY DIRECTIONS

WATERBORNE PATHOGENS ARE A THREAT FROM MANY DIRECTIONS

Water and secondary infection go back to the beginning of man. Today's waterborne infections are growing partly because of older infrastructure, and they are more difficult to control because of ever-growing antimicrobial resistance (AMR). But perhaps one object you might not imagine being a potential threat is your showerhead. You jump in with the notion of getting clean and you might leave only after being exposed to a variety of microbes sent to you from inside the showerhead, microbes that take advantage of ideal conditions to colonize. The microbes inside vary but certainly some can be opportunistic pathogens that have the potential to do harm.

One study at a hospital shows that the microbiome in showerheads offer a way for opportunistic pathogens to spread. Who are the microbes in your hospital's showerhead? In your showerhead? In your showerhead?, which appears at microBEnet (microbiology of the Built Environment network) and does a nice job of summarizing the study. Among other things, it points out that the study predicts that potential opportunistic pathogens were present and that many of the organisms in the sample appear to carry antibiotic resistance gene.

10th death added to Legionnaires' outbreak in Genesee, which appears at the Detroit News website, reports that a 10th death recently was confirmed in the 2014-15 Flint-area spike in Legionnaires' disease cases. The death in Genesee County of a Shiawassee County resident fits into the time frame of when the city used Flint River water, although a direct connection hasn't been established. Flint is the site of the much-publicized case where lead contamination resulted when corrosive Flint River water caused lead from aging pipes to leach into the city's water supply. The newspaper story says that: "In total, 88 people contracted the respiratory illness, which comes from waterborne bacteria."

Rate this blog entry:
ALL VEHICLES THAT CONTRIBUTE TO DISEASE SPREAD, IN...
WHO REPORT: UNHEALTHY LIVING, WORKING ENVIRONMENT...

Related Posts

 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Thursday, 19 April 2018
If you'd like to register, please fill in the username, password and name fields.